Sentences 4


I’ve written a few installments of this (1, 2, and 3) and I enjoy it.  These are some one-sentence theological or philosophical propositions that I contend are true, delivered along with a head nod to Mr. Peter Abelard, and his Medieval book, Sentences.


Everyone who wants to be God will end up hating God (see:  Pharaoh in Exodus, Herod the Great, Satan). 
Self-esteem can never fix what what self-worship caused.  

A good skill to teach your kids that it seems to me is going to be increasingly at a premium is the willingness to look someone in the eye and tell them exactly what they feel and why.  

The art of speaking clearly is only important if you want to teach, persuade, be understood, raise children, be a good employee, or have healthy human relationships.  
Some unbelieving men most need to know Christianity is satisfying, others most need to know it is true, still others that it can change them, but there aren’t many moments when a man is thirsting for each reality equally; Evangelist, know your man.   

If you have never been admonished or rebuked, you don’t have a true friend. 

One of the most important distinctions in ethics that our generation seems unwilling to make is the distinction between what I like and what is right, or, if you prefer, what I want to be morally positive and what is indeed morally positive.

Character:  What a man is and what he loves.  

Lasting, world-changing Christianity, in an individual or a family or a church or a nation, requires obedience to the Scriptures.   

Grace and peace!

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Sentences (Again)

  
A month or so ago I wrote a post simply made up of theological sentences that I held to and believed.  The idea was based (ridiculously loosely) on Peter Abelard’s classic Medieval theological textbook Sentences.  It was I think, the most read post I’ve ever had, so I figured I’d re-gift it.  

Here are a few more theological/Spiritual/ecclesiastical sentences from the heart (via the IPhone) of yours truly:  

  • There is an almost universal temptation to assume the best possible motive for what you yourself do and to assume the worst motive for what other people do; resist that temptation. 
  • It is generally best not to trust the man who claims to know God but does not know his Bible.  
  • One of the things the Bible’s existence undergirds for me is this:  My belief that it is appropriate for entities, whether they be churches, marriages, or governments, to be built on written documents; if it’s worth having, it’s worth writing out.
  • If you are a Christian, then I can virtually guarantee that you have underestimated God’s love for you; I can do that because the love of God for His sheep in the crucified Jesus surpasses all the knowledge you could ever collect and store in your brain.  
  • Generally speaking, I don’t find it to be good to invest Christian leadership in someone who hasn’t shown (over a pretty good period of time) that he is ready to do the slow, steady work of personal holiness.
  • I know it’s a word whose definition isn’t as clear as I’d like (depending on the circle you’re talking in), but I am still more than ready to wear the label “evangelical.”
  • Ecclesiastes is a difficult book to interpret and exposit well. 
  • Evangelism can be both a dutiful hard work and an overflow of the heart; after all, the best kind of tired is joyful tired, where you’re worn out from doing something hard that you really love doing.  

Happy weekend, all!